Frequently Used Methods of Java HashMap

HashMap is very useful when a counter is required.

HashMap<String, Integer> countMap = new HashMap<String, Integer>();
 
//.... a lot of a's like the following
if(countMap.keySet().contains(a)){
	countMap.put(a, countMap.get(a)+1);
}else{
	countMap.put(a, 1);
}

1. Loop Through HashMap

Iterator it = mp.entrySet().iterator();
while (it.hasNext()) {
    Map.Entry pairs = (Map.Entry)it.next();
    System.out.println(pairs.getKey() + " = " + pairs.getValue());
}
Map<Integer, Integer> map = new HashMap<Integer, Integer>();
for (Map.Entry<Integer, Integer> entry : map.entrySet()) {
    System.out.println("Key = " + entry.getKey() + ", Value = " + entry.getValue());
}

2. Print HashMap

public static void printMap(Map mp) {
    Iterator it = mp.entrySet().iterator();
    while (it.hasNext()) {
        Map.Entry pairs = (Map.Entry)it.next();
        System.out.println(pairs.getKey() + " = " + pairs.getValue());
        it.remove(); // avoids a ConcurrentModificationException
    }
}

3. Sort HashMap by Value

The following code example take advantage of a constructor of TreeMap here.

class ValueComparator implements Comparator<String> {
 
    Map<String, Integer> base;
 
    public ValueComparator(Map<String, Integer> base) {
        this.base = base;
    }
 
    public int compare(String a, String b) {
        if (base.get(a) >= base.get(b)) {
            return -1;
        } else {
            return 1;
        } // returning 0 would merge keys
    }
}
HashMap<String, Integer> countMap = new HashMap<String, Integer>();
//add a lot of entries
countMap.put("a", 10);
countMap.put("b", 20);
 
ValueComparator vc =  new ValueComparator(countMap);
TreeMap<String,Integer> sortedMap = new TreeMap<String,Integer>(vc);
 
sortedMap.putAll(countMap);  
 
printMap(sortedMap);

There are different ways of sorting HashMap, this way has been voted the most in stackoverflow.

Category >> Collections >> Good Code  
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  • SOLDIER

    very useful,thanks to god

  • Darkphen

    The sort by value part is wrong 🙂

    Look at this post : https://plus.google.com/+LouisWasserman/posts/bEQLDK712MJ

    Louis Wasserman (yes, one of the Google Guava guys), actually dislikes this answer quite a bit: “It breaks in several really confusing ways if you even look at it funny. If the backing map changes, it will break. If multiple keys map to the same value, it will break. If you call get on a key that isn’t in the backing map, it will break. If you do anything whatsoever that would cause a lookup to happen on a key that isn’t in the map — a Map.equals call, containsKey, anything — it will break with really weird stack traces.”