Python django.core() Examples

The following are code examples for showing how to use django.core(). They are extracted from open source Python projects. You can vote up the examples you like or vote down the ones you don't like. You can also save this page to your account.

Example 1
Project: CodingDojo   Author: ComputerSocietyUNB   File: __init__.py    (license) View Source Project 5 votes vote down vote up
def get_commands():
    """
    Returns a dictionary mapping command names to their callback applications.

    This works by looking for a management.commands package in django.core, and
    in each installed application -- if a commands package exists, all commands
    in that package are registered.

    Core commands are always included. If a settings module has been
    specified, user-defined commands will also be included.

    The dictionary is in the format {command_name: app_name}. Key-value
    pairs from this dictionary can then be used in calls to
    load_command_class(app_name, command_name)

    If a specific version of a command must be loaded (e.g., with the
    startapp command), the instantiated module can be placed in the
    dictionary in place of the application name.

    The dictionary is cached on the first call and reused on subsequent
    calls.
    """
    commands = {name: 'django.core' for name in find_commands(upath(__path__[0]))}

    if not settings.configured:
        return commands

    for app_config in reversed(list(apps.get_app_configs())):
        path = os.path.join(app_config.path, 'management')
        commands.update({name: app_config.name for name in find_commands(path)})

    return commands 
Example 2
Project: CodingDojo   Author: ComputerSocietyUNB   File: __init__.py    (license) View Source Project 5 votes vote down vote up
def main_help_text(self, commands_only=False):
        """
        Returns the script's main help text, as a string.
        """
        if commands_only:
            usage = sorted(get_commands().keys())
        else:
            usage = [
                "",
                "Type '%s help <subcommand>' for help on a specific subcommand." % self.prog_name,
                "",
                "Available subcommands:",
            ]
            commands_dict = defaultdict(lambda: [])
            for name, app in six.iteritems(get_commands()):
                if app == 'django.core':
                    app = 'django'
                else:
                    app = app.rpartition('.')[-1]
                commands_dict[app].append(name)
            style = color_style()
            for app in sorted(commands_dict.keys()):
                usage.append("")
                usage.append(style.NOTICE("[%s]" % app))
                for name in sorted(commands_dict[app]):
                    usage.append("    %s" % name)
            # Output an extra note if settings are not properly configured
            if self.settings_exception is not None:
                usage.append(style.NOTICE(
                    "Note that only Django core commands are listed "
                    "as settings are not properly configured (error: %s)."
                    % self.settings_exception))

        return '\n'.join(usage) 
Example 3
Project: NarshaTech   Author: KimJangHyeon   File: __init__.py    (license) View Source Project 5 votes vote down vote up
def get_commands():
    """
    Returns a dictionary mapping command names to their callback applications.

    This works by looking for a management.commands package in django.core, and
    in each installed application -- if a commands package exists, all commands
    in that package are registered.

    Core commands are always included. If a settings module has been
    specified, user-defined commands will also be included.

    The dictionary is in the format {command_name: app_name}. Key-value
    pairs from this dictionary can then be used in calls to
    load_command_class(app_name, command_name)

    If a specific version of a command must be loaded (e.g., with the
    startapp command), the instantiated module can be placed in the
    dictionary in place of the application name.

    The dictionary is cached on the first call and reused on subsequent
    calls.
    """
    commands = {name: 'django.core' for name in find_commands(upath(__path__[0]))}

    if not settings.configured:
        return commands

    for app_config in reversed(list(apps.get_app_configs())):
        path = os.path.join(app_config.path, 'management')
        commands.update({name: app_config.name for name in find_commands(path)})

    return commands 
Example 4
Project: NarshaTech   Author: KimJangHyeon   File: __init__.py    (license) View Source Project 5 votes vote down vote up
def main_help_text(self, commands_only=False):
        """
        Returns the script's main help text, as a string.
        """
        if commands_only:
            usage = sorted(get_commands().keys())
        else:
            usage = [
                "",
                "Type '%s help <subcommand>' for help on a specific subcommand." % self.prog_name,
                "",
                "Available subcommands:",
            ]
            commands_dict = defaultdict(lambda: [])
            for name, app in six.iteritems(get_commands()):
                if app == 'django.core':
                    app = 'django'
                else:
                    app = app.rpartition('.')[-1]
                commands_dict[app].append(name)
            style = color_style()
            for app in sorted(commands_dict.keys()):
                usage.append("")
                usage.append(style.NOTICE("[%s]" % app))
                for name in sorted(commands_dict[app]):
                    usage.append("    %s" % name)
            # Output an extra note if settings are not properly configured
            if self.settings_exception is not None:
                usage.append(style.NOTICE(
                    "Note that only Django core commands are listed "
                    "as settings are not properly configured (error: %s)."
                    % self.settings_exception))

        return '\n'.join(usage) 
Example 5
Project: Scrum   Author: prakharchoudhary   File: __init__.py    (license) View Source Project 5 votes vote down vote up
def get_commands():
    """
    Returns a dictionary mapping command names to their callback applications.

    This works by looking for a management.commands package in django.core, and
    in each installed application -- if a commands package exists, all commands
    in that package are registered.

    Core commands are always included. If a settings module has been
    specified, user-defined commands will also be included.

    The dictionary is in the format {command_name: app_name}. Key-value
    pairs from this dictionary can then be used in calls to
    load_command_class(app_name, command_name)

    If a specific version of a command must be loaded (e.g., with the
    startapp command), the instantiated module can be placed in the
    dictionary in place of the application name.

    The dictionary is cached on the first call and reused on subsequent
    calls.
    """
    commands = {name: 'django.core' for name in find_commands(upath(__path__[0]))}

    if not settings.configured:
        return commands

    for app_config in reversed(list(apps.get_app_configs())):
        path = os.path.join(app_config.path, 'management')
        commands.update({name: app_config.name for name in find_commands(path)})

    return commands 
Example 6
Project: Scrum   Author: prakharchoudhary   File: __init__.py    (license) View Source Project 5 votes vote down vote up
def main_help_text(self, commands_only=False):
        """
        Returns the script's main help text, as a string.
        """
        if commands_only:
            usage = sorted(get_commands().keys())
        else:
            usage = [
                "",
                "Type '%s help <subcommand>' for help on a specific subcommand." % self.prog_name,
                "",
                "Available subcommands:",
            ]
            commands_dict = defaultdict(lambda: [])
            for name, app in six.iteritems(get_commands()):
                if app == 'django.core':
                    app = 'django'
                else:
                    app = app.rpartition('.')[-1]
                commands_dict[app].append(name)
            style = color_style()
            for app in sorted(commands_dict.keys()):
                usage.append("")
                usage.append(style.NOTICE("[%s]" % app))
                for name in sorted(commands_dict[app]):
                    usage.append("    %s" % name)
            # Output an extra note if settings are not properly configured
            if self.settings_exception is not None:
                usage.append(style.NOTICE(
                    "Note that only Django core commands are listed "
                    "as settings are not properly configured (error: %s)."
                    % self.settings_exception))

        return '\n'.join(usage) 
Example 7
Project: django   Author: alexsukhrin   File: __init__.py    (license) View Source Project 5 votes vote down vote up
def get_commands():
    """
    Returns a dictionary mapping command names to their callback applications.

    This works by looking for a management.commands package in django.core, and
    in each installed application -- if a commands package exists, all commands
    in that package are registered.

    Core commands are always included. If a settings module has been
    specified, user-defined commands will also be included.

    The dictionary is in the format {command_name: app_name}. Key-value
    pairs from this dictionary can then be used in calls to
    load_command_class(app_name, command_name)

    If a specific version of a command must be loaded (e.g., with the
    startapp command), the instantiated module can be placed in the
    dictionary in place of the application name.

    The dictionary is cached on the first call and reused on subsequent
    calls.
    """
    commands = {name: 'django.core' for name in find_commands(upath(__path__[0]))}

    if not settings.configured:
        return commands

    for app_config in reversed(list(apps.get_app_configs())):
        path = os.path.join(app_config.path, 'management')
        commands.update({name: app_config.name for name in find_commands(path)})

    return commands 
Example 8
Project: django   Author: alexsukhrin   File: __init__.py    (license) View Source Project 5 votes vote down vote up
def main_help_text(self, commands_only=False):
        """
        Returns the script's main help text, as a string.
        """
        if commands_only:
            usage = sorted(get_commands().keys())
        else:
            usage = [
                "",
                "Type '%s help <subcommand>' for help on a specific subcommand." % self.prog_name,
                "",
                "Available subcommands:",
            ]
            commands_dict = defaultdict(lambda: [])
            for name, app in six.iteritems(get_commands()):
                if app == 'django.core':
                    app = 'django'
                else:
                    app = app.rpartition('.')[-1]
                commands_dict[app].append(name)
            style = color_style()
            for app in sorted(commands_dict.keys()):
                usage.append("")
                usage.append(style.NOTICE("[%s]" % app))
                for name in sorted(commands_dict[app]):
                    usage.append("    %s" % name)
            # Output an extra note if settings are not properly configured
            if self.settings_exception is not None:
                usage.append(style.NOTICE(
                    "Note that only Django core commands are listed "
                    "as settings are not properly configured (error: %s)."
                    % self.settings_exception))

        return '\n'.join(usage) 
Example 9
Project: pretalx   Author: pretalx   File: setup.py    (license) View Source Project 5 votes vote down vote up
def run(self):
        os.environ.setdefault("DJANGO_SETTINGS_MODULE", "pretalx.settings")
        import django
        django.setup()
        from django.conf import settings
        from django.core import management

        settings.COMPRESS_ENABLED = True
        settings.COMPRESS_OFFLINE = True

        management.call_command('compilemessages', verbosity=1)
        management.call_command('collectstatic', verbosity=1, interactive=False)
        management.call_command('compress', verbosity=1)
        build.run(self) 
Example 10
Project: Gypsy   Author: benticarlos   File: __init__.py    (license) View Source Project 5 votes vote down vote up
def get_commands():
    """
    Returns a dictionary mapping command names to their callback applications.

    This works by looking for a management.commands package in django.core, and
    in each installed application -- if a commands package exists, all commands
    in that package are registered.

    Core commands are always included. If a settings module has been
    specified, user-defined commands will also be included.

    The dictionary is in the format {command_name: app_name}. Key-value
    pairs from this dictionary can then be used in calls to
    load_command_class(app_name, command_name)

    If a specific version of a command must be loaded (e.g., with the
    startapp command), the instantiated module can be placed in the
    dictionary in place of the application name.

    The dictionary is cached on the first call and reused on subsequent
    calls.
    """
    commands = {name: 'django.core' for name in find_commands(upath(__path__[0]))}

    if not settings.configured:
        return commands

    for app_config in reversed(list(apps.get_app_configs())):
        path = os.path.join(app_config.path, 'management')
        commands.update({name: app_config.name for name in find_commands(path)})

    return commands 
Example 11
Project: Gypsy   Author: benticarlos   File: __init__.py    (license) View Source Project 5 votes vote down vote up
def main_help_text(self, commands_only=False):
        """
        Returns the script's main help text, as a string.
        """
        if commands_only:
            usage = sorted(get_commands().keys())
        else:
            usage = [
                "",
                "Type '%s help <subcommand>' for help on a specific subcommand." % self.prog_name,
                "",
                "Available subcommands:",
            ]
            commands_dict = defaultdict(lambda: [])
            for name, app in six.iteritems(get_commands()):
                if app == 'django.core':
                    app = 'django'
                else:
                    app = app.rpartition('.')[-1]
                commands_dict[app].append(name)
            style = color_style()
            for app in sorted(commands_dict.keys()):
                usage.append("")
                usage.append(style.NOTICE("[%s]" % app))
                for name in sorted(commands_dict[app]):
                    usage.append("    %s" % name)
            # Output an extra note if settings are not properly configured
            if self.settings_exception is not None:
                usage.append(style.NOTICE(
                    "Note that only Django core commands are listed "
                    "as settings are not properly configured (error: %s)."
                    % self.settings_exception))

        return '\n'.join(usage) 
Example 12
Project: DjangoBlog   Author: 0daybug   File: __init__.py    (license) View Source Project 5 votes vote down vote up
def get_commands():
    """
    Returns a dictionary mapping command names to their callback applications.

    This works by looking for a management.commands package in django.core, and
    in each installed application -- if a commands package exists, all commands
    in that package are registered.

    Core commands are always included. If a settings module has been
    specified, user-defined commands will also be included.

    The dictionary is in the format {command_name: app_name}. Key-value
    pairs from this dictionary can then be used in calls to
    load_command_class(app_name, command_name)

    If a specific version of a command must be loaded (e.g., with the
    startapp command), the instantiated module can be placed in the
    dictionary in place of the application name.

    The dictionary is cached on the first call and reused on subsequent
    calls.
    """
    commands = {name: 'django.core' for name in find_commands(upath(__path__[0]))}

    if not settings.configured:
        return commands

    for app_config in reversed(list(apps.get_app_configs())):
        path = os.path.join(app_config.path, 'management')
        commands.update({name: app_config.name for name in find_commands(path)})

    return commands 
Example 13
Project: DjangoBlog   Author: 0daybug   File: __init__.py    (license) View Source Project 5 votes vote down vote up
def main_help_text(self, commands_only=False):
        """
        Returns the script's main help text, as a string.
        """
        if commands_only:
            usage = sorted(get_commands().keys())
        else:
            usage = [
                "",
                "Type '%s help <subcommand>' for help on a specific subcommand." % self.prog_name,
                "",
                "Available subcommands:",
            ]
            commands_dict = collections.defaultdict(lambda: [])
            for name, app in six.iteritems(get_commands()):
                if app == 'django.core':
                    app = 'django'
                else:
                    app = app.rpartition('.')[-1]
                commands_dict[app].append(name)
            style = color_style()
            for app in sorted(commands_dict.keys()):
                usage.append("")
                usage.append(style.NOTICE("[%s]" % app))
                for name in sorted(commands_dict[app]):
                    usage.append("    %s" % name)
            # Output an extra note if settings are not properly configured
            if self.settings_exception is not None:
                usage.append(style.NOTICE(
                    "Note that only Django core commands are listed "
                    "as settings are not properly configured (error: %s)."
                    % self.settings_exception))

        return '\n'.join(usage) 
Example 14
Project: wanblog   Author: wanzifa   File: __init__.py    (license) View Source Project 5 votes vote down vote up
def get_commands():
    """
    Returns a dictionary mapping command names to their callback applications.

    This works by looking for a management.commands package in django.core, and
    in each installed application -- if a commands package exists, all commands
    in that package are registered.

    Core commands are always included. If a settings module has been
    specified, user-defined commands will also be included.

    The dictionary is in the format {command_name: app_name}. Key-value
    pairs from this dictionary can then be used in calls to
    load_command_class(app_name, command_name)

    If a specific version of a command must be loaded (e.g., with the
    startapp command), the instantiated module can be placed in the
    dictionary in place of the application name.

    The dictionary is cached on the first call and reused on subsequent
    calls.
    """
    commands = {name: 'django.core' for name in find_commands(upath(__path__[0]))}

    if not settings.configured:
        return commands

    for app_config in reversed(list(apps.get_app_configs())):
        path = os.path.join(app_config.path, 'management')
        commands.update({name: app_config.name for name in find_commands(path)})

    return commands 
Example 15
Project: wanblog   Author: wanzifa   File: __init__.py    (license) View Source Project 5 votes vote down vote up
def main_help_text(self, commands_only=False):
        """
        Returns the script's main help text, as a string.
        """
        if commands_only:
            usage = sorted(get_commands().keys())
        else:
            usage = [
                "",
                "Type '%s help <subcommand>' for help on a specific subcommand." % self.prog_name,
                "",
                "Available subcommands:",
            ]
            commands_dict = defaultdict(lambda: [])
            for name, app in six.iteritems(get_commands()):
                if app == 'django.core':
                    app = 'django'
                else:
                    app = app.rpartition('.')[-1]
                commands_dict[app].append(name)
            style = color_style()
            for app in sorted(commands_dict.keys()):
                usage.append("")
                usage.append(style.NOTICE("[%s]" % app))
                for name in sorted(commands_dict[app]):
                    usage.append("    %s" % name)
            # Output an extra note if settings are not properly configured
            if self.settings_exception is not None:
                usage.append(style.NOTICE(
                    "Note that only Django core commands are listed "
                    "as settings are not properly configured (error: %s)."
                    % self.settings_exception))

        return '\n'.join(usage) 
Example 16
Project: tabmaster   Author: NicolasMinghetti   File: __init__.py    (license) View Source Project 5 votes vote down vote up
def get_commands():
    """
    Returns a dictionary mapping command names to their callback applications.

    This works by looking for a management.commands package in django.core, and
    in each installed application -- if a commands package exists, all commands
    in that package are registered.

    Core commands are always included. If a settings module has been
    specified, user-defined commands will also be included.

    The dictionary is in the format {command_name: app_name}. Key-value
    pairs from this dictionary can then be used in calls to
    load_command_class(app_name, command_name)

    If a specific version of a command must be loaded (e.g., with the
    startapp command), the instantiated module can be placed in the
    dictionary in place of the application name.

    The dictionary is cached on the first call and reused on subsequent
    calls.
    """
    commands = {name: 'django.core' for name in find_commands(upath(__path__[0]))}

    if not settings.configured:
        return commands

    for app_config in reversed(list(apps.get_app_configs())):
        path = os.path.join(app_config.path, 'management')
        commands.update({name: app_config.name for name in find_commands(path)})

    return commands 
Example 17
Project: tabmaster   Author: NicolasMinghetti   File: __init__.py    (license) View Source Project 5 votes vote down vote up
def main_help_text(self, commands_only=False):
        """
        Returns the script's main help text, as a string.
        """
        if commands_only:
            usage = sorted(get_commands().keys())
        else:
            usage = [
                "",
                "Type '%s help <subcommand>' for help on a specific subcommand." % self.prog_name,
                "",
                "Available subcommands:",
            ]
            commands_dict = defaultdict(lambda: [])
            for name, app in six.iteritems(get_commands()):
                if app == 'django.core':
                    app = 'django'
                else:
                    app = app.rpartition('.')[-1]
                commands_dict[app].append(name)
            style = color_style()
            for app in sorted(commands_dict.keys()):
                usage.append("")
                usage.append(style.NOTICE("[%s]" % app))
                for name in sorted(commands_dict[app]):
                    usage.append("    %s" % name)
            # Output an extra note if settings are not properly configured
            if self.settings_exception is not None:
                usage.append(style.NOTICE(
                    "Note that only Django core commands are listed "
                    "as settings are not properly configured (error: %s)."
                    % self.settings_exception))

        return '\n'.join(usage) 
Example 18
Project: trydjango18   Author: lucifer-yqh   File: __init__.py    (license) View Source Project 5 votes vote down vote up
def get_commands():
    """
    Returns a dictionary mapping command names to their callback applications.

    This works by looking for a management.commands package in django.core, and
    in each installed application -- if a commands package exists, all commands
    in that package are registered.

    Core commands are always included. If a settings module has been
    specified, user-defined commands will also be included.

    The dictionary is in the format {command_name: app_name}. Key-value
    pairs from this dictionary can then be used in calls to
    load_command_class(app_name, command_name)

    If a specific version of a command must be loaded (e.g., with the
    startapp command), the instantiated module can be placed in the
    dictionary in place of the application name.

    The dictionary is cached on the first call and reused on subsequent
    calls.
    """
    commands = {name: 'django.core' for name in find_commands(upath(__path__[0]))}

    if not settings.configured:
        return commands

    for app_config in reversed(list(apps.get_app_configs())):
        path = os.path.join(app_config.path, 'management')
        commands.update({name: app_config.name for name in find_commands(path)})

    return commands 
Example 19
Project: trydjango18   Author: lucifer-yqh   File: __init__.py    (license) View Source Project 5 votes vote down vote up
def main_help_text(self, commands_only=False):
        """
        Returns the script's main help text, as a string.
        """
        if commands_only:
            usage = sorted(get_commands().keys())
        else:
            usage = [
                "",
                "Type '%s help <subcommand>' for help on a specific subcommand." % self.prog_name,
                "",
                "Available subcommands:",
            ]
            commands_dict = collections.defaultdict(lambda: [])
            for name, app in six.iteritems(get_commands()):
                if app == 'django.core':
                    app = 'django'
                else:
                    app = app.rpartition('.')[-1]
                commands_dict[app].append(name)
            style = color_style()
            for app in sorted(commands_dict.keys()):
                usage.append("")
                usage.append(style.NOTICE("[%s]" % app))
                for name in sorted(commands_dict[app]):
                    usage.append("    %s" % name)
            # Output an extra note if settings are not properly configured
            if self.settings_exception is not None:
                usage.append(style.NOTICE(
                    "Note that only Django core commands are listed "
                    "as settings are not properly configured (error: %s)."
                    % self.settings_exception))

        return '\n'.join(usage) 
Example 20
Project: trydjango18   Author: wei0104   File: __init__.py    (license) View Source Project 5 votes vote down vote up
def get_commands():
    """
    Returns a dictionary mapping command names to their callback applications.

    This works by looking for a management.commands package in django.core, and
    in each installed application -- if a commands package exists, all commands
    in that package are registered.

    Core commands are always included. If a settings module has been
    specified, user-defined commands will also be included.

    The dictionary is in the format {command_name: app_name}. Key-value
    pairs from this dictionary can then be used in calls to
    load_command_class(app_name, command_name)

    If a specific version of a command must be loaded (e.g., with the
    startapp command), the instantiated module can be placed in the
    dictionary in place of the application name.

    The dictionary is cached on the first call and reused on subsequent
    calls.
    """
    commands = {name: 'django.core' for name in find_commands(upath(__path__[0]))}

    if not settings.configured:
        return commands

    for app_config in reversed(list(apps.get_app_configs())):
        path = os.path.join(app_config.path, 'management')
        commands.update({name: app_config.name for name in find_commands(path)})

    return commands 
Example 21
Project: trydjango18   Author: wei0104   File: __init__.py    (license) View Source Project 5 votes vote down vote up
def main_help_text(self, commands_only=False):
        """
        Returns the script's main help text, as a string.
        """
        if commands_only:
            usage = sorted(get_commands().keys())
        else:
            usage = [
                "",
                "Type '%s help <subcommand>' for help on a specific subcommand." % self.prog_name,
                "",
                "Available subcommands:",
            ]
            commands_dict = collections.defaultdict(lambda: [])
            for name, app in six.iteritems(get_commands()):
                if app == 'django.core':
                    app = 'django'
                else:
                    app = app.rpartition('.')[-1]
                commands_dict[app].append(name)
            style = color_style()
            for app in sorted(commands_dict.keys()):
                usage.append("")
                usage.append(style.NOTICE("[%s]" % app))
                for name in sorted(commands_dict[app]):
                    usage.append("    %s" % name)
            # Output an extra note if settings are not properly configured
            if self.settings_exception is not None:
                usage.append(style.NOTICE(
                    "Note that only Django core commands are listed "
                    "as settings are not properly configured (error: %s)."
                    % self.settings_exception))

        return '\n'.join(usage) 
Example 22
Project: ims   Author: ims-team   File: __init__.py    (license) View Source Project 5 votes vote down vote up
def get_commands():
    """
    Returns a dictionary mapping command names to their callback applications.

    This works by looking for a management.commands package in django.core, and
    in each installed application -- if a commands package exists, all commands
    in that package are registered.

    Core commands are always included. If a settings module has been
    specified, user-defined commands will also be included.

    The dictionary is in the format {command_name: app_name}. Key-value
    pairs from this dictionary can then be used in calls to
    load_command_class(app_name, command_name)

    If a specific version of a command must be loaded (e.g., with the
    startapp command), the instantiated module can be placed in the
    dictionary in place of the application name.

    The dictionary is cached on the first call and reused on subsequent
    calls.
    """
    commands = {name: 'django.core' for name in find_commands(upath(__path__[0]))}

    if not settings.configured:
        return commands

    for app_config in reversed(list(apps.get_app_configs())):
        path = os.path.join(app_config.path, 'management')
        commands.update({name: app_config.name for name in find_commands(path)})

    return commands 
Example 23
Project: ims   Author: ims-team   File: __init__.py    (license) View Source Project 5 votes vote down vote up
def main_help_text(self, commands_only=False):
        """
        Returns the script's main help text, as a string.
        """
        if commands_only:
            usage = sorted(get_commands().keys())
        else:
            usage = [
                "",
                "Type '%s help <subcommand>' for help on a specific subcommand." % self.prog_name,
                "",
                "Available subcommands:",
            ]
            commands_dict = defaultdict(lambda: [])
            for name, app in six.iteritems(get_commands()):
                if app == 'django.core':
                    app = 'django'
                else:
                    app = app.rpartition('.')[-1]
                commands_dict[app].append(name)
            style = color_style()
            for app in sorted(commands_dict.keys()):
                usage.append("")
                usage.append(style.NOTICE("[%s]" % app))
                for name in sorted(commands_dict[app]):
                    usage.append("    %s" % name)
            # Output an extra note if settings are not properly configured
            if self.settings_exception is not None:
                usage.append(style.NOTICE(
                    "Note that only Django core commands are listed "
                    "as settings are not properly configured (error: %s)."
                    % self.settings_exception))

        return '\n'.join(usage) 
Example 24
Project: lifesoundtrack   Author: MTG   File: __init__.py    (license) View Source Project 5 votes vote down vote up
def get_commands():
    """
    Returns a dictionary mapping command names to their callback applications.

    This works by looking for a management.commands package in django.core, and
    in each installed application -- if a commands package exists, all commands
    in that package are registered.

    Core commands are always included. If a settings module has been
    specified, user-defined commands will also be included.

    The dictionary is in the format {command_name: app_name}. Key-value
    pairs from this dictionary can then be used in calls to
    load_command_class(app_name, command_name)

    If a specific version of a command must be loaded (e.g., with the
    startapp command), the instantiated module can be placed in the
    dictionary in place of the application name.

    The dictionary is cached on the first call and reused on subsequent
    calls.
    """
    commands = {name: 'django.core' for name in find_commands(upath(__path__[0]))}

    if not settings.configured:
        return commands

    for app_config in reversed(list(apps.get_app_configs())):
        path = os.path.join(app_config.path, 'management')
        commands.update({name: app_config.name for name in find_commands(path)})

    return commands 
Example 25
Project: lifesoundtrack   Author: MTG   File: __init__.py    (license) View Source Project 5 votes vote down vote up
def main_help_text(self, commands_only=False):
        """
        Returns the script's main help text, as a string.
        """
        if commands_only:
            usage = sorted(get_commands().keys())
        else:
            usage = [
                "",
                "Type '%s help <subcommand>' for help on a specific subcommand." % self.prog_name,
                "",
                "Available subcommands:",
            ]
            commands_dict = defaultdict(lambda: [])
            for name, app in six.iteritems(get_commands()):
                if app == 'django.core':
                    app = 'django'
                else:
                    app = app.rpartition('.')[-1]
                commands_dict[app].append(name)
            style = color_style()
            for app in sorted(commands_dict.keys()):
                usage.append("")
                usage.append(style.NOTICE("[%s]" % app))
                for name in sorted(commands_dict[app]):
                    usage.append("    %s" % name)
            # Output an extra note if settings are not properly configured
            if self.settings_exception is not None:
                usage.append(style.NOTICE(
                    "Note that only Django core commands are listed "
                    "as settings are not properly configured (error: %s)."
                    % self.settings_exception))

        return '\n'.join(usage) 
Example 26
Project: django-open-lecture   Author: DmLitov4   File: __init__.py    (license) View Source Project 5 votes vote down vote up
def get_commands():
    """
    Returns a dictionary mapping command names to their callback applications.

    This works by looking for a management.commands package in django.core, and
    in each installed application -- if a commands package exists, all commands
    in that package are registered.

    Core commands are always included. If a settings module has been
    specified, user-defined commands will also be included.

    The dictionary is in the format {command_name: app_name}. Key-value
    pairs from this dictionary can then be used in calls to
    load_command_class(app_name, command_name)

    If a specific version of a command must be loaded (e.g., with the
    startapp command), the instantiated module can be placed in the
    dictionary in place of the application name.

    The dictionary is cached on the first call and reused on subsequent
    calls.
    """
    commands = {name: 'django.core' for name in find_commands(upath(__path__[0]))}

    if not settings.configured:
        return commands

    for app_config in reversed(list(apps.get_app_configs())):
        path = os.path.join(app_config.path, 'management')
        commands.update({name: app_config.name for name in find_commands(path)})

    return commands 
Example 27
Project: django-open-lecture   Author: DmLitov4   File: __init__.py    (license) View Source Project 5 votes vote down vote up
def main_help_text(self, commands_only=False):
        """
        Returns the script's main help text, as a string.
        """
        if commands_only:
            usage = sorted(get_commands().keys())
        else:
            usage = [
                "",
                "Type '%s help <subcommand>' for help on a specific subcommand." % self.prog_name,
                "",
                "Available subcommands:",
            ]
            commands_dict = defaultdict(lambda: [])
            for name, app in six.iteritems(get_commands()):
                if app == 'django.core':
                    app = 'django'
                else:
                    app = app.rpartition('.')[-1]
                commands_dict[app].append(name)
            style = color_style()
            for app in sorted(commands_dict.keys()):
                usage.append("")
                usage.append(style.NOTICE("[%s]" % app))
                for name in sorted(commands_dict[app]):
                    usage.append("    %s" % name)
            # Output an extra note if settings are not properly configured
            if self.settings_exception is not None:
                usage.append(style.NOTICE(
                    "Note that only Django core commands are listed "
                    "as settings are not properly configured (error: %s)."
                    % self.settings_exception))

        return '\n'.join(usage) 
Example 28
Project: travlr   Author: gauravkulkarni96   File: __init__.py    (license) View Source Project 5 votes vote down vote up
def get_commands():
    """
    Returns a dictionary mapping command names to their callback applications.

    This works by looking for a management.commands package in django.core, and
    in each installed application -- if a commands package exists, all commands
    in that package are registered.

    Core commands are always included. If a settings module has been
    specified, user-defined commands will also be included.

    The dictionary is in the format {command_name: app_name}. Key-value
    pairs from this dictionary can then be used in calls to
    load_command_class(app_name, command_name)

    If a specific version of a command must be loaded (e.g., with the
    startapp command), the instantiated module can be placed in the
    dictionary in place of the application name.

    The dictionary is cached on the first call and reused on subsequent
    calls.
    """
    commands = {name: 'django.core' for name in find_commands(upath(__path__[0]))}

    if not settings.configured:
        return commands

    for app_config in reversed(list(apps.get_app_configs())):
        path = os.path.join(app_config.path, 'management')
        commands.update({name: app_config.name for name in find_commands(path)})

    return commands 
Example 29
Project: travlr   Author: gauravkulkarni96   File: __init__.py    (license) View Source Project 5 votes vote down vote up
def main_help_text(self, commands_only=False):
        """
        Returns the script's main help text, as a string.
        """
        if commands_only:
            usage = sorted(get_commands().keys())
        else:
            usage = [
                "",
                "Type '%s help <subcommand>' for help on a specific subcommand." % self.prog_name,
                "",
                "Available subcommands:",
            ]
            commands_dict = defaultdict(lambda: [])
            for name, app in six.iteritems(get_commands()):
                if app == 'django.core':
                    app = 'django'
                else:
                    app = app.rpartition('.')[-1]
                commands_dict[app].append(name)
            style = color_style()
            for app in sorted(commands_dict.keys()):
                usage.append("")
                usage.append(style.NOTICE("[%s]" % app))
                for name in sorted(commands_dict[app]):
                    usage.append("    %s" % name)
            # Output an extra note if settings are not properly configured
            if self.settings_exception is not None:
                usage.append(style.NOTICE(
                    "Note that only Django core commands are listed "
                    "as settings are not properly configured (error: %s)."
                    % self.settings_exception))

        return '\n'.join(usage) 
Example 30
Project: logo-gen   Author: jellene4eva   File: __init__.py    (license) View Source Project 5 votes vote down vote up
def get_commands():
    """
    Returns a dictionary mapping command names to their callback applications.

    This works by looking for a management.commands package in django.core, and
    in each installed application -- if a commands package exists, all commands
    in that package are registered.

    Core commands are always included. If a settings module has been
    specified, user-defined commands will also be included.

    The dictionary is in the format {command_name: app_name}. Key-value
    pairs from this dictionary can then be used in calls to
    load_command_class(app_name, command_name)

    If a specific version of a command must be loaded (e.g., with the
    startapp command), the instantiated module can be placed in the
    dictionary in place of the application name.

    The dictionary is cached on the first call and reused on subsequent
    calls.
    """
    commands = {name: 'django.core' for name in find_commands(upath(__path__[0]))}

    if not settings.configured:
        return commands

    for app_config in reversed(list(apps.get_app_configs())):
        path = os.path.join(app_config.path, 'management')
        commands.update({name: app_config.name for name in find_commands(path)})

    return commands 
Example 31
Project: logo-gen   Author: jellene4eva   File: __init__.py    (license) View Source Project 5 votes vote down vote up
def main_help_text(self, commands_only=False):
        """
        Returns the script's main help text, as a string.
        """
        if commands_only:
            usage = sorted(get_commands().keys())
        else:
            usage = [
                "",
                "Type '%s help <subcommand>' for help on a specific subcommand." % self.prog_name,
                "",
                "Available subcommands:",
            ]
            commands_dict = defaultdict(lambda: [])
            for name, app in six.iteritems(get_commands()):
                if app == 'django.core':
                    app = 'django'
                else:
                    app = app.rpartition('.')[-1]
                commands_dict[app].append(name)
            style = color_style()
            for app in sorted(commands_dict.keys()):
                usage.append("")
                usage.append(style.NOTICE("[%s]" % app))
                for name in sorted(commands_dict[app]):
                    usage.append("    %s" % name)
            # Output an extra note if settings are not properly configured
            if self.settings_exception is not None:
                usage.append(style.NOTICE(
                    "Note that only Django core commands are listed "
                    "as settings are not properly configured (error: %s)."
                    % self.settings_exception))

        return '\n'.join(usage) 
Example 32
Project: liberator   Author: libscie   File: __init__.py    (license) View Source Project 5 votes vote down vote up
def get_commands():
    """
    Returns a dictionary mapping command names to their callback applications.

    This works by looking for a management.commands package in django.core, and
    in each installed application -- if a commands package exists, all commands
    in that package are registered.

    Core commands are always included. If a settings module has been
    specified, user-defined commands will also be included.

    The dictionary is in the format {command_name: app_name}. Key-value
    pairs from this dictionary can then be used in calls to
    load_command_class(app_name, command_name)

    If a specific version of a command must be loaded (e.g., with the
    startapp command), the instantiated module can be placed in the
    dictionary in place of the application name.

    The dictionary is cached on the first call and reused on subsequent
    calls.
    """
    commands = {name: 'django.core' for name in find_commands(upath(__path__[0]))}

    if not settings.configured:
        return commands

    for app_config in reversed(list(apps.get_app_configs())):
        path = os.path.join(app_config.path, 'management')
        commands.update({name: app_config.name for name in find_commands(path)})

    return commands 
Example 33
Project: liberator   Author: libscie   File: __init__.py    (license) View Source Project 5 votes vote down vote up
def main_help_text(self, commands_only=False):
        """
        Returns the script's main help text, as a string.
        """
        if commands_only:
            usage = sorted(get_commands().keys())
        else:
            usage = [
                "",
                "Type '%s help <subcommand>' for help on a specific subcommand." % self.prog_name,
                "",
                "Available subcommands:",
            ]
            commands_dict = defaultdict(lambda: [])
            for name, app in six.iteritems(get_commands()):
                if app == 'django.core':
                    app = 'django'
                else:
                    app = app.rpartition('.')[-1]
                commands_dict[app].append(name)
            style = color_style()
            for app in sorted(commands_dict.keys()):
                usage.append("")
                usage.append(style.NOTICE("[%s]" % app))
                for name in sorted(commands_dict[app]):
                    usage.append("    %s" % name)
            # Output an extra note if settings are not properly configured
            if self.settings_exception is not None:
                usage.append(style.NOTICE(
                    "Note that only Django core commands are listed "
                    "as settings are not properly configured (error: %s)."
                    % self.settings_exception))

        return '\n'.join(usage) 
Example 34
Project: gmail_scanner   Author: brandonhub   File: __init__.py    (license) View Source Project 5 votes vote down vote up
def get_commands():
    """
    Returns a dictionary mapping command names to their callback applications.

    This works by looking for a management.commands package in django.core, and
    in each installed application -- if a commands package exists, all commands
    in that package are registered.

    Core commands are always included. If a settings module has been
    specified, user-defined commands will also be included.

    The dictionary is in the format {command_name: app_name}. Key-value
    pairs from this dictionary can then be used in calls to
    load_command_class(app_name, command_name)

    If a specific version of a command must be loaded (e.g., with the
    startapp command), the instantiated module can be placed in the
    dictionary in place of the application name.

    The dictionary is cached on the first call and reused on subsequent
    calls.
    """
    commands = {name: 'django.core' for name in find_commands(upath(__path__[0]))}

    if not settings.configured:
        return commands

    for app_config in reversed(list(apps.get_app_configs())):
        path = os.path.join(app_config.path, 'management')
        commands.update({name: app_config.name for name in find_commands(path)})

    return commands 
Example 35
Project: gmail_scanner   Author: brandonhub   File: __init__.py    (license) View Source Project 5 votes vote down vote up
def main_help_text(self, commands_only=False):
        """
        Returns the script's main help text, as a string.
        """
        if commands_only:
            usage = sorted(get_commands().keys())
        else:
            usage = [
                "",
                "Type '%s help <subcommand>' for help on a specific subcommand." % self.prog_name,
                "",
                "Available subcommands:",
            ]
            commands_dict = defaultdict(lambda: [])
            for name, app in six.iteritems(get_commands()):
                if app == 'django.core':
                    app = 'django'
                else:
                    app = app.rpartition('.')[-1]
                commands_dict[app].append(name)
            style = color_style()
            for app in sorted(commands_dict.keys()):
                usage.append("")
                usage.append(style.NOTICE("[%s]" % app))
                for name in sorted(commands_dict[app]):
                    usage.append("    %s" % name)
            # Output an extra note if settings are not properly configured
            if self.settings_exception is not None:
                usage.append(style.NOTICE(
                    "Note that only Django core commands are listed "
                    "as settings are not properly configured (error: %s)."
                    % self.settings_exception))

        return '\n'.join(usage) 
Example 36
Project: djanoDoc   Author: JustinChavez   File: __init__.py    (license) View Source Project 5 votes vote down vote up
def get_commands():
    """
    Returns a dictionary mapping command names to their callback applications.

    This works by looking for a management.commands package in django.core, and
    in each installed application -- if a commands package exists, all commands
    in that package are registered.

    Core commands are always included. If a settings module has been
    specified, user-defined commands will also be included.

    The dictionary is in the format {command_name: app_name}. Key-value
    pairs from this dictionary can then be used in calls to
    load_command_class(app_name, command_name)

    If a specific version of a command must be loaded (e.g., with the
    startapp command), the instantiated module can be placed in the
    dictionary in place of the application name.

    The dictionary is cached on the first call and reused on subsequent
    calls.
    """
    commands = {name: 'django.core' for name in find_commands(upath(__path__[0]))}

    if not settings.configured:
        return commands

    for app_config in reversed(list(apps.get_app_configs())):
        path = os.path.join(app_config.path, 'management')
        commands.update({name: app_config.name for name in find_commands(path)})

    return commands 
Example 37
Project: djanoDoc   Author: JustinChavez   File: __init__.py    (license) View Source Project 5 votes vote down vote up
def main_help_text(self, commands_only=False):
        """
        Returns the script's main help text, as a string.
        """
        if commands_only:
            usage = sorted(get_commands().keys())
        else:
            usage = [
                "",
                "Type '%s help <subcommand>' for help on a specific subcommand." % self.prog_name,
                "",
                "Available subcommands:",
            ]
            commands_dict = defaultdict(lambda: [])
            for name, app in six.iteritems(get_commands()):
                if app == 'django.core':
                    app = 'django'
                else:
                    app = app.rpartition('.')[-1]
                commands_dict[app].append(name)
            style = color_style()
            for app in sorted(commands_dict.keys()):
                usage.append("")
                usage.append(style.NOTICE("[%s]" % app))
                for name in sorted(commands_dict[app]):
                    usage.append("    %s" % name)
            # Output an extra note if settings are not properly configured
            if self.settings_exception is not None:
                usage.append(style.NOTICE(
                    "Note that only Django core commands are listed "
                    "as settings are not properly configured (error: %s)."
                    % self.settings_exception))

        return '\n'.join(usage) 
Example 38
Project: CSCE482-WordcloudPlus   Author: ggaytan00   File: __init__.py    (license) View Source Project 5 votes vote down vote up
def get_commands():
    """
    Returns a dictionary mapping command names to their callback applications.

    This works by looking for a management.commands package in django.core, and
    in each installed application -- if a commands package exists, all commands
    in that package are registered.

    Core commands are always included. If a settings module has been
    specified, user-defined commands will also be included.

    The dictionary is in the format {command_name: app_name}. Key-value
    pairs from this dictionary can then be used in calls to
    load_command_class(app_name, command_name)

    If a specific version of a command must be loaded (e.g., with the
    startapp command), the instantiated module can be placed in the
    dictionary in place of the application name.

    The dictionary is cached on the first call and reused on subsequent
    calls.
    """
    commands = {name: 'django.core' for name in find_commands(upath(__path__[0]))}

    if not settings.configured:
        return commands

    for app_config in reversed(list(apps.get_app_configs())):
        path = os.path.join(app_config.path, 'management')
        commands.update({name: app_config.name for name in find_commands(path)})

    return commands 
Example 39
Project: CSCE482-WordcloudPlus   Author: ggaytan00   File: __init__.py    (license) View Source Project 5 votes vote down vote up
def main_help_text(self, commands_only=False):
        """
        Returns the script's main help text, as a string.
        """
        if commands_only:
            usage = sorted(get_commands().keys())
        else:
            usage = [
                "",
                "Type '%s help <subcommand>' for help on a specific subcommand." % self.prog_name,
                "",
                "Available subcommands:",
            ]
            commands_dict = defaultdict(lambda: [])
            for name, app in six.iteritems(get_commands()):
                if app == 'django.core':
                    app = 'django'
                else:
                    app = app.rpartition('.')[-1]
                commands_dict[app].append(name)
            style = color_style()
            for app in sorted(commands_dict.keys()):
                usage.append("")
                usage.append(style.NOTICE("[%s]" % app))
                for name in sorted(commands_dict[app]):
                    usage.append("    %s" % name)
            # Output an extra note if settings are not properly configured
            if self.settings_exception is not None:
                usage.append(style.NOTICE(
                    "Note that only Django core commands are listed "
                    "as settings are not properly configured (error: %s)."
                    % self.settings_exception))

        return '\n'.join(usage) 
Example 40
Project: producthunt   Author: davidgengler   File: __init__.py    (license) View Source Project 5 votes vote down vote up
def get_commands():
    """
    Returns a dictionary mapping command names to their callback applications.

    This works by looking for a management.commands package in django.core, and
    in each installed application -- if a commands package exists, all commands
    in that package are registered.

    Core commands are always included. If a settings module has been
    specified, user-defined commands will also be included.

    The dictionary is in the format {command_name: app_name}. Key-value
    pairs from this dictionary can then be used in calls to
    load_command_class(app_name, command_name)

    If a specific version of a command must be loaded (e.g., with the
    startapp command), the instantiated module can be placed in the
    dictionary in place of the application name.

    The dictionary is cached on the first call and reused on subsequent
    calls.
    """
    commands = {name: 'django.core' for name in find_commands(upath(__path__[0]))}

    if not settings.configured:
        return commands

    for app_config in reversed(list(apps.get_app_configs())):
        path = os.path.join(app_config.path, 'management')
        commands.update({name: app_config.name for name in find_commands(path)})

    return commands 
Example 41
Project: producthunt   Author: davidgengler   File: __init__.py    (license) View Source Project 5 votes vote down vote up
def main_help_text(self, commands_only=False):
        """
        Returns the script's main help text, as a string.
        """
        if commands_only:
            usage = sorted(get_commands().keys())
        else:
            usage = [
                "",
                "Type '%s help <subcommand>' for help on a specific subcommand." % self.prog_name,
                "",
                "Available subcommands:",
            ]
            commands_dict = defaultdict(lambda: [])
            for name, app in six.iteritems(get_commands()):
                if app == 'django.core':
                    app = 'django'
                else:
                    app = app.rpartition('.')[-1]
                commands_dict[app].append(name)
            style = color_style()
            for app in sorted(commands_dict.keys()):
                usage.append("")
                usage.append(style.NOTICE("[%s]" % app))
                for name in sorted(commands_dict[app]):
                    usage.append("    %s" % name)
            # Output an extra note if settings are not properly configured
            if self.settings_exception is not None:
                usage.append(style.NOTICE(
                    "Note that only Django core commands are listed "
                    "as settings are not properly configured (error: %s)."
                    % self.settings_exception))

        return '\n'.join(usage) 
Example 42
Project: django-rtc   Author: scifiswapnil   File: __init__.py    (license) View Source Project 5 votes vote down vote up
def get_commands():
    """
    Returns a dictionary mapping command names to their callback applications.

    This works by looking for a management.commands package in django.core, and
    in each installed application -- if a commands package exists, all commands
    in that package are registered.

    Core commands are always included. If a settings module has been
    specified, user-defined commands will also be included.

    The dictionary is in the format {command_name: app_name}. Key-value
    pairs from this dictionary can then be used in calls to
    load_command_class(app_name, command_name)

    If a specific version of a command must be loaded (e.g., with the
    startapp command), the instantiated module can be placed in the
    dictionary in place of the application name.

    The dictionary is cached on the first call and reused on subsequent
    calls.
    """
    commands = {name: 'django.core' for name in find_commands(upath(__path__[0]))}

    if not settings.configured:
        return commands

    for app_config in reversed(list(apps.get_app_configs())):
        path = os.path.join(app_config.path, 'management')
        commands.update({name: app_config.name for name in find_commands(path)})

    return commands 
Example 43
Project: django-rtc   Author: scifiswapnil   File: __init__.py    (license) View Source Project 5 votes vote down vote up
def main_help_text(self, commands_only=False):
        """
        Returns the script's main help text, as a string.
        """
        if commands_only:
            usage = sorted(get_commands().keys())
        else:
            usage = [
                "",
                "Type '%s help <subcommand>' for help on a specific subcommand." % self.prog_name,
                "",
                "Available subcommands:",
            ]
            commands_dict = defaultdict(lambda: [])
            for name, app in six.iteritems(get_commands()):
                if app == 'django.core':
                    app = 'django'
                else:
                    app = app.rpartition('.')[-1]
                commands_dict[app].append(name)
            style = color_style()
            for app in sorted(commands_dict.keys()):
                usage.append("")
                usage.append(style.NOTICE("[%s]" % app))
                for name in sorted(commands_dict[app]):
                    usage.append("    %s" % name)
            # Output an extra note if settings are not properly configured
            if self.settings_exception is not None:
                usage.append(style.NOTICE(
                    "Note that only Django core commands are listed "
                    "as settings are not properly configured (error: %s)."
                    % self.settings_exception))

        return '\n'.join(usage) 
Example 44
Project: geekpoint   Author: Lujinghu   File: __init__.py    (license) View Source Project 5 votes vote down vote up
def get_commands():
    """
    Returns a dictionary mapping command names to their callback applications.

    This works by looking for a management.commands package in django.core, and
    in each installed application -- if a commands package exists, all commands
    in that package are registered.

    Core commands are always included. If a settings module has been
    specified, user-defined commands will also be included.

    The dictionary is in the format {command_name: app_name}. Key-value
    pairs from this dictionary can then be used in calls to
    load_command_class(app_name, command_name)

    If a specific version of a command must be loaded (e.g., with the
    startapp command), the instantiated module can be placed in the
    dictionary in place of the application name.

    The dictionary is cached on the first call and reused on subsequent
    calls.
    """
    commands = {name: 'django.core' for name in find_commands(upath(__path__[0]))}

    if not settings.configured:
        return commands

    for app_config in reversed(list(apps.get_app_configs())):
        path = os.path.join(app_config.path, 'management')
        commands.update({name: app_config.name for name in find_commands(path)})

    return commands 
Example 45
Project: geekpoint   Author: Lujinghu   File: __init__.py    (license) View Source Project 5 votes vote down vote up
def main_help_text(self, commands_only=False):
        """
        Returns the script's main help text, as a string.
        """
        if commands_only:
            usage = sorted(get_commands().keys())
        else:
            usage = [
                "",
                "Type '%s help <subcommand>' for help on a specific subcommand." % self.prog_name,
                "",
                "Available subcommands:",
            ]
            commands_dict = collections.defaultdict(lambda: [])
            for name, app in six.iteritems(get_commands()):
                if app == 'django.core':
                    app = 'django'
                else:
                    app = app.rpartition('.')[-1]
                commands_dict[app].append(name)
            style = color_style()
            for app in sorted(commands_dict.keys()):
                usage.append("")
                usage.append(style.NOTICE("[%s]" % app))
                for name in sorted(commands_dict[app]):
                    usage.append("    %s" % name)
            # Output an extra note if settings are not properly configured
            if self.settings_exception is not None:
                usage.append(style.NOTICE(
                    "Note that only Django core commands are listed "
                    "as settings are not properly configured (error: %s)."
                    % self.settings_exception))

        return '\n'.join(usage) 
Example 46
Project: django-next-train   Author: bitpixdigital   File: __init__.py    (license) View Source Project 5 votes vote down vote up
def get_commands():
    """
    Returns a dictionary mapping command names to their callback applications.

    This works by looking for a management.commands package in django.core, and
    in each installed application -- if a commands package exists, all commands
    in that package are registered.

    Core commands are always included. If a settings module has been
    specified, user-defined commands will also be included.

    The dictionary is in the format {command_name: app_name}. Key-value
    pairs from this dictionary can then be used in calls to
    load_command_class(app_name, command_name)

    If a specific version of a command must be loaded (e.g., with the
    startapp command), the instantiated module can be placed in the
    dictionary in place of the application name.

    The dictionary is cached on the first call and reused on subsequent
    calls.
    """
    commands = {name: 'django.core' for name in find_commands(upath(__path__[0]))}

    if not settings.configured:
        return commands

    for app_config in reversed(list(apps.get_app_configs())):
        path = os.path.join(app_config.path, 'management')
        commands.update({name: app_config.name for name in find_commands(path)})

    return commands 
Example 47
Project: django-next-train   Author: bitpixdigital   File: __init__.py    (license) View Source Project 5 votes vote down vote up
def main_help_text(self, commands_only=False):
        """
        Returns the script's main help text, as a string.
        """
        if commands_only:
            usage = sorted(get_commands().keys())
        else:
            usage = [
                "",
                "Type '%s help <subcommand>' for help on a specific subcommand." % self.prog_name,
                "",
                "Available subcommands:",
            ]
            commands_dict = defaultdict(lambda: [])
            for name, app in six.iteritems(get_commands()):
                if app == 'django.core':
                    app = 'django'
                else:
                    app = app.rpartition('.')[-1]
                commands_dict[app].append(name)
            style = color_style()
            for app in sorted(commands_dict.keys()):
                usage.append("")
                usage.append(style.NOTICE("[%s]" % app))
                for name in sorted(commands_dict[app]):
                    usage.append("    %s" % name)
            # Output an extra note if settings are not properly configured
            if self.settings_exception is not None:
                usage.append(style.NOTICE(
                    "Note that only Django core commands are listed "
                    "as settings are not properly configured (error: %s)."
                    % self.settings_exception))

        return '\n'.join(usage) 
Example 48
Project: LatinSounds_AppEnviaMail   Author: G3ek-aR   File: __init__.py    (license) View Source Project 5 votes vote down vote up
def get_commands():
    """
    Returns a dictionary mapping command names to their callback applications.

    This works by looking for a management.commands package in django.core, and
    in each installed application -- if a commands package exists, all commands
    in that package are registered.

    Core commands are always included. If a settings module has been
    specified, user-defined commands will also be included.

    The dictionary is in the format {command_name: app_name}. Key-value
    pairs from this dictionary can then be used in calls to
    load_command_class(app_name, command_name)

    If a specific version of a command must be loaded (e.g., with the
    startapp command), the instantiated module can be placed in the
    dictionary in place of the application name.

    The dictionary is cached on the first call and reused on subsequent
    calls.
    """
    commands = {name: 'django.core' for name in find_commands(upath(__path__[0]))}

    if not settings.configured:
        return commands

    for app_config in reversed(list(apps.get_app_configs())):
        path = os.path.join(app_config.path, 'management')
        commands.update({name: app_config.name for name in find_commands(path)})

    return commands 
Example 49
Project: LatinSounds_AppEnviaMail   Author: G3ek-aR   File: __init__.py    (license) View Source Project 5 votes vote down vote up
def main_help_text(self, commands_only=False):
        """
        Returns the script's main help text, as a string.
        """
        if commands_only:
            usage = sorted(get_commands().keys())
        else:
            usage = [
                "",
                "Type '%s help <subcommand>' for help on a specific subcommand." % self.prog_name,
                "",
                "Available subcommands:",
            ]
            commands_dict = defaultdict(lambda: [])
            for name, app in six.iteritems(get_commands()):
                if app == 'django.core':
                    app = 'django'
                else:
                    app = app.rpartition('.')[-1]
                commands_dict[app].append(name)
            style = color_style()
            for app in sorted(commands_dict.keys()):
                usage.append("")
                usage.append(style.NOTICE("[%s]" % app))
                for name in sorted(commands_dict[app]):
                    usage.append("    %s" % name)
            # Output an extra note if settings are not properly configured
            if self.settings_exception is not None:
                usage.append(style.NOTICE(
                    "Note that only Django core commands are listed "
                    "as settings are not properly configured (error: %s)."
                    % self.settings_exception))

        return '\n'.join(usage) 
Example 50
Project: DjangoZeroToHero   Author: RayParra   File: __init__.py    (license) View Source Project 5 votes vote down vote up
def get_commands():
    """
    Returns a dictionary mapping command names to their callback applications.

    This works by looking for a management.commands package in django.core, and
    in each installed application -- if a commands package exists, all commands
    in that package are registered.

    Core commands are always included. If a settings module has been
    specified, user-defined commands will also be included.

    The dictionary is in the format {command_name: app_name}. Key-value
    pairs from this dictionary can then be used in calls to
    load_command_class(app_name, command_name)

    If a specific version of a command must be loaded (e.g., with the
    startapp command), the instantiated module can be placed in the
    dictionary in place of the application name.

    The dictionary is cached on the first call and reused on subsequent
    calls.
    """
    commands = {name: 'django.core' for name in find_commands(upath(__path__[0]))}

    if not settings.configured:
        return commands

    for app_config in reversed(list(apps.get_app_configs())):
        path = os.path.join(app_config.path, 'management')
        commands.update({name: app_config.name for name in find_commands(path)})

    return commands