Python collections._count_elements() Examples

The following are code examples for showing how to use collections._count_elements(). They are extracted from open source Python projects. You can vote up the examples you like or vote down the exmaples you don't like. You can also save this page to your account.

Example 1
Project: hakkuframework   Author: 4shadoww   File: misc.py    (license) View Source Project 5 votes vote down vote up
def _count_elements(mapping, iterable):
    'Tally elements from the iterable.'
    mapping_get = mapping.get
    for elem in iterable:
        mapping[elem] = mapping_get(elem, 0) + 1 
Example 2
Project: hakkuframework   Author: 4shadoww   File: misc.py    (license) View Source Project 5 votes vote down vote up
def update(*args, **kwds):
        '''Like dict.update() but add counts instead of replacing them.

        Source can be an iterable, a dictionary, or another Counter instance.

        >>> c = Counter('which')
        >>> c.update('witch')           # add elements from another iterable
        >>> d = Counter('watch')
        >>> c.update(d)                 # add elements from another counter
        >>> c['h']                      # four 'h' in which, witch, and watch
        4

        '''
        # The regular dict.update() operation makes no sense here because the
        # replace behavior results in the some of original untouched counts
        # being mixed-in with all of the other counts for a mismash that
        # doesn't have a straight-forward interpretation in most counting
        # contexts.  Instead, we implement straight-addition.  Both the inputs
        # and outputs are allowed to contain zero and negative counts.

        if not args:
            raise TypeError("descriptor 'update' of 'Counter' object "
                            "needs an argument")
        self = args[0]
        args = args[1:]
        if len(args) > 1:
            raise TypeError('expected at most 1 arguments, got %d' % len(args))
        iterable = args[0] if args else None
        if iterable is not None:
            if isinstance(iterable, Mapping):
                if self:
                    self_get = self.get
                    for elem, count in iterable.items():
                        self[elem] = count + self_get(elem, 0)
                else:
                    super(Counter, self).update(iterable) # fast path when counter is empty
            else:
                _count_elements(self, iterable)
        if kwds:
            self.update(kwds) 
Example 3
Project: packaging   Author: blockstack   File: misc.py    (license) View Source Project 5 votes vote down vote up
def _count_elements(mapping, iterable):
    'Tally elements from the iterable.'
    mapping_get = mapping.get
    for elem in iterable:
        mapping[elem] = mapping_get(elem, 0) + 1 
Example 4
Project: packaging   Author: blockstack   File: misc.py    (license) View Source Project 5 votes vote down vote up
def update(*args, **kwds):
        '''Like dict.update() but add counts instead of replacing them.

        Source can be an iterable, a dictionary, or another Counter instance.

        >>> c = Counter('which')
        >>> c.update('witch')           # add elements from another iterable
        >>> d = Counter('watch')
        >>> c.update(d)                 # add elements from another counter
        >>> c['h']                      # four 'h' in which, witch, and watch
        4

        '''
        # The regular dict.update() operation makes no sense here because the
        # replace behavior results in the some of original untouched counts
        # being mixed-in with all of the other counts for a mismash that
        # doesn't have a straight-forward interpretation in most counting
        # contexts.  Instead, we implement straight-addition.  Both the inputs
        # and outputs are allowed to contain zero and negative counts.

        if not args:
            raise TypeError("descriptor 'update' of 'Counter' object "
                            "needs an argument")
        self = args[0]
        args = args[1:]
        if len(args) > 1:
            raise TypeError('expected at most 1 arguments, got %d' % len(args))
        iterable = args[0] if args else None
        if iterable is not None:
            if isinstance(iterable, Mapping):
                if self:
                    self_get = self.get
                    for elem, count in iterable.items():
                        self[elem] = count + self_get(elem, 0)
                else:
                    super(Counter, self).update(iterable) # fast path when counter is empty
            else:
                _count_elements(self, iterable)
        if kwds:
            self.update(kwds) 
Example 5
Project: islam-buddy   Author: hamir   File: misc.py    (license) View Source Project 5 votes vote down vote up
def _count_elements(mapping, iterable):
    'Tally elements from the iterable.'
    mapping_get = mapping.get
    for elem in iterable:
        mapping[elem] = mapping_get(elem, 0) + 1 
Example 6
Project: islam-buddy   Author: hamir   File: misc.py    (license) View Source Project 5 votes vote down vote up
def update(*args, **kwds):
        '''Like dict.update() but add counts instead of replacing them.

        Source can be an iterable, a dictionary, or another Counter instance.

        >>> c = Counter('which')
        >>> c.update('witch')           # add elements from another iterable
        >>> d = Counter('watch')
        >>> c.update(d)                 # add elements from another counter
        >>> c['h']                      # four 'h' in which, witch, and watch
        4

        '''
        # The regular dict.update() operation makes no sense here because the
        # replace behavior results in the some of original untouched counts
        # being mixed-in with all of the other counts for a mismash that
        # doesn't have a straight-forward interpretation in most counting
        # contexts.  Instead, we implement straight-addition.  Both the inputs
        # and outputs are allowed to contain zero and negative counts.

        if not args:
            raise TypeError("descriptor 'update' of 'Counter' object "
                            "needs an argument")
        self = args[0]
        args = args[1:]
        if len(args) > 1:
            raise TypeError('expected at most 1 arguments, got %d' % len(args))
        iterable = args[0] if args else None
        if iterable is not None:
            if isinstance(iterable, Mapping):
                if self:
                    self_get = self.get
                    for elem, count in iterable.items():
                        self[elem] = count + self_get(elem, 0)
                else:
                    super(Counter, self).update(iterable) # fast path when counter is empty
            else:
                _count_elements(self, iterable)
        if kwds:
            self.update(kwds) 
Example 7
Project: Repobot   Author: Desgard   File: misc.py    (license) View Source Project 5 votes vote down vote up
def _count_elements(mapping, iterable):
    'Tally elements from the iterable.'
    mapping_get = mapping.get
    for elem in iterable:
        mapping[elem] = mapping_get(elem, 0) + 1 
Example 8
Project: Repobot   Author: Desgard   File: misc.py    (license) View Source Project 5 votes vote down vote up
def update(*args, **kwds):
        '''Like dict.update() but add counts instead of replacing them.

        Source can be an iterable, a dictionary, or another Counter instance.

        >>> c = Counter('which')
        >>> c.update('witch')           # add elements from another iterable
        >>> d = Counter('watch')
        >>> c.update(d)                 # add elements from another counter
        >>> c['h']                      # four 'h' in which, witch, and watch
        4

        '''
        # The regular dict.update() operation makes no sense here because the
        # replace behavior results in the some of original untouched counts
        # being mixed-in with all of the other counts for a mismash that
        # doesn't have a straight-forward interpretation in most counting
        # contexts.  Instead, we implement straight-addition.  Both the inputs
        # and outputs are allowed to contain zero and negative counts.

        if not args:
            raise TypeError("descriptor 'update' of 'Counter' object "
                            "needs an argument")
        self = args[0]
        args = args[1:]
        if len(args) > 1:
            raise TypeError('expected at most 1 arguments, got %d' % len(args))
        iterable = args[0] if args else None
        if iterable is not None:
            if isinstance(iterable, Mapping):
                if self:
                    self_get = self.get
                    for elem, count in iterable.items():
                        self[elem] = count + self_get(elem, 0)
                else:
                    super(Counter, self).update(iterable) # fast path when counter is empty
            else:
                _count_elements(self, iterable)
        if kwds:
            self.update(kwds) 
Example 9
Project: UMOG   Author: hsab   File: misc.py    (license) View Source Project 5 votes vote down vote up
def _count_elements(mapping, iterable):
    'Tally elements from the iterable.'
    mapping_get = mapping.get
    for elem in iterable:
        mapping[elem] = mapping_get(elem, 0) + 1 
Example 10
Project: UMOG   Author: hsab   File: misc.py    (license) View Source Project 5 votes vote down vote up
def update(*args, **kwds):
        '''Like dict.update() but add counts instead of replacing them.

        Source can be an iterable, a dictionary, or another Counter instance.

        >>> c = Counter('which')
        >>> c.update('witch')           # add elements from another iterable
        >>> d = Counter('watch')
        >>> c.update(d)                 # add elements from another counter
        >>> c['h']                      # four 'h' in which, witch, and watch
        4

        '''
        # The regular dict.update() operation makes no sense here because the
        # replace behavior results in the some of original untouched counts
        # being mixed-in with all of the other counts for a mismash that
        # doesn't have a straight-forward interpretation in most counting
        # contexts.  Instead, we implement straight-addition.  Both the inputs
        # and outputs are allowed to contain zero and negative counts.

        if not args:
            raise TypeError("descriptor 'update' of 'Counter' object "
                            "needs an argument")
        self = args[0]
        args = args[1:]
        if len(args) > 1:
            raise TypeError('expected at most 1 arguments, got %d' % len(args))
        iterable = args[0] if args else None
        if iterable is not None:
            if isinstance(iterable, Mapping):
                if self:
                    self_get = self.get
                    for elem, count in iterable.items():
                        self[elem] = count + self_get(elem, 0)
                else:
                    super(Counter, self).update(iterable) # fast path when counter is empty
            else:
                _count_elements(self, iterable)
        if kwds:
            self.update(kwds) 
Example 11
Project: blackmamba   Author: zrzka   File: misc.py    (license) View Source Project 5 votes vote down vote up
def _count_elements(mapping, iterable):
    'Tally elements from the iterable.'
    mapping_get = mapping.get
    for elem in iterable:
        mapping[elem] = mapping_get(elem, 0) + 1 
Example 12
Project: blackmamba   Author: zrzka   File: misc.py    (license) View Source Project 5 votes vote down vote up
def update(*args, **kwds):
        '''Like dict.update() but add counts instead of replacing them.

        Source can be an iterable, a dictionary, or another Counter instance.

        >>> c = Counter('which')
        >>> c.update('witch')           # add elements from another iterable
        >>> d = Counter('watch')
        >>> c.update(d)                 # add elements from another counter
        >>> c['h']                      # four 'h' in which, witch, and watch
        4

        '''
        # The regular dict.update() operation makes no sense here because the
        # replace behavior results in the some of original untouched counts
        # being mixed-in with all of the other counts for a mismash that
        # doesn't have a straight-forward interpretation in most counting
        # contexts.  Instead, we implement straight-addition.  Both the inputs
        # and outputs are allowed to contain zero and negative counts.

        if not args:
            raise TypeError("descriptor 'update' of 'Counter' object "
                            "needs an argument")
        self = args[0]
        args = args[1:]
        if len(args) > 1:
            raise TypeError('expected at most 1 arguments, got %d' % len(args))
        iterable = args[0] if args else None
        if iterable is not None:
            if isinstance(iterable, Mapping):
                if self:
                    self_get = self.get
                    for elem, count in iterable.items():
                        self[elem] = count + self_get(elem, 0)
                else:
                    super(Counter, self).update(iterable) # fast path when counter is empty
            else:
                _count_elements(self, iterable)
        if kwds:
            self.update(kwds) 
Example 13
Project: beepboop   Author: nicolehe   File: misc.py    (license) View Source Project 5 votes vote down vote up
def _count_elements(mapping, iterable):
    'Tally elements from the iterable.'
    mapping_get = mapping.get
    for elem in iterable:
        mapping[elem] = mapping_get(elem, 0) + 1 
Example 14
Project: beepboop   Author: nicolehe   File: misc.py    (license) View Source Project 5 votes vote down vote up
def update(*args, **kwds):
        '''Like dict.update() but add counts instead of replacing them.

        Source can be an iterable, a dictionary, or another Counter instance.

        >>> c = Counter('which')
        >>> c.update('witch')           # add elements from another iterable
        >>> d = Counter('watch')
        >>> c.update(d)                 # add elements from another counter
        >>> c['h']                      # four 'h' in which, witch, and watch
        4

        '''
        # The regular dict.update() operation makes no sense here because the
        # replace behavior results in the some of original untouched counts
        # being mixed-in with all of the other counts for a mismash that
        # doesn't have a straight-forward interpretation in most counting
        # contexts.  Instead, we implement straight-addition.  Both the inputs
        # and outputs are allowed to contain zero and negative counts.

        if not args:
            raise TypeError("descriptor 'update' of 'Counter' object "
                            "needs an argument")
        self = args[0]
        args = args[1:]
        if len(args) > 1:
            raise TypeError('expected at most 1 arguments, got %d' % len(args))
        iterable = args[0] if args else None
        if iterable is not None:
            if isinstance(iterable, Mapping):
                if self:
                    self_get = self.get
                    for elem, count in iterable.items():
                        self[elem] = count + self_get(elem, 0)
                else:
                    super(Counter, self).update(iterable) # fast path when counter is empty
            else:
                _count_elements(self, iterable)
        if kwds:
            self.update(kwds) 
Example 15
Project: hackathon   Author: vertica   File: misc.py    (license) View Source Project 5 votes vote down vote up
def _count_elements(mapping, iterable):
    'Tally elements from the iterable.'
    mapping_get = mapping.get
    for elem in iterable:
        mapping[elem] = mapping_get(elem, 0) + 1 
Example 16
Project: hackathon   Author: vertica   File: misc.py    (license) View Source Project 5 votes vote down vote up
def update(*args, **kwds):
        '''Like dict.update() but add counts instead of replacing them.

        Source can be an iterable, a dictionary, or another Counter instance.

        >>> c = Counter('which')
        >>> c.update('witch')           # add elements from another iterable
        >>> d = Counter('watch')
        >>> c.update(d)                 # add elements from another counter
        >>> c['h']                      # four 'h' in which, witch, and watch
        4

        '''
        # The regular dict.update() operation makes no sense here because the
        # replace behavior results in the some of original untouched counts
        # being mixed-in with all of the other counts for a mismash that
        # doesn't have a straight-forward interpretation in most counting
        # contexts.  Instead, we implement straight-addition.  Both the inputs
        # and outputs are allowed to contain zero and negative counts.

        if not args:
            raise TypeError("descriptor 'update' of 'Counter' object "
                            "needs an argument")
        self = args[0]
        args = args[1:]
        if len(args) > 1:
            raise TypeError('expected at most 1 arguments, got %d' % len(args))
        iterable = args[0] if args else None
        if iterable is not None:
            if isinstance(iterable, Mapping):
                if self:
                    self_get = self.get
                    for elem, count in iterable.items():
                        self[elem] = count + self_get(elem, 0)
                else:
                    super(Counter, self).update(iterable) # fast path when counter is empty
            else:
                _count_elements(self, iterable)
        if kwds:
            self.update(kwds) 
Example 17
Project: yatta_reader   Author: sound88   File: misc.py    (license) View Source Project 5 votes vote down vote up
def _count_elements(mapping, iterable):
    'Tally elements from the iterable.'
    mapping_get = mapping.get
    for elem in iterable:
        mapping[elem] = mapping_get(elem, 0) + 1 
Example 18
Project: yatta_reader   Author: sound88   File: misc.py    (license) View Source Project 5 votes vote down vote up
def update(*args, **kwds):
        '''Like dict.update() but add counts instead of replacing them.

        Source can be an iterable, a dictionary, or another Counter instance.

        >>> c = Counter('which')
        >>> c.update('witch')           # add elements from another iterable
        >>> d = Counter('watch')
        >>> c.update(d)                 # add elements from another counter
        >>> c['h']                      # four 'h' in which, witch, and watch
        4

        '''
        # The regular dict.update() operation makes no sense here because the
        # replace behavior results in the some of original untouched counts
        # being mixed-in with all of the other counts for a mismash that
        # doesn't have a straight-forward interpretation in most counting
        # contexts.  Instead, we implement straight-addition.  Both the inputs
        # and outputs are allowed to contain zero and negative counts.

        if not args:
            raise TypeError("descriptor 'update' of 'Counter' object "
                            "needs an argument")
        self = args[0]
        args = args[1:]
        if len(args) > 1:
            raise TypeError('expected at most 1 arguments, got %d' % len(args))
        iterable = args[0] if args else None
        if iterable is not None:
            if isinstance(iterable, Mapping):
                if self:
                    self_get = self.get
                    for elem, count in iterable.items():
                        self[elem] = count + self_get(elem, 0)
                else:
                    super(Counter, self).update(iterable) # fast path when counter is empty
            else:
                _count_elements(self, iterable)
        if kwds:
            self.update(kwds)