Amforeas

The Greek word for ‘amphora’, a type of container usually found on ancient ships.

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A RESTful Interface to your database

Amforeas is a server which allows CRUD operations over any of the supported RDBMS using REST.

By using REST, different CRUD operations are performed by different HTTP methods:

Where a resources is a table or a view.

Amforeas is based on the premise that you love your database, hence there's no administration. If there's something missing in Amforeas, it probably means you have to do it in your database (roles, triggers, stored procedures, views, etc.) or build a more suitable backend solution.

Features

You can

Usages

This are some projects where Amforeas is ideal:

Currently supported databases

Future

Installation

For installation instructions check the Wiki


Examples

This examples are from data when running Amforeas with a demo application.

Read (GET) a resource

To read (GET) a user with id 1 from its table, we perform the following:

$curl -i -X GET -H "Accept: application/json" "http://localhost:8080/amforeas/demo1/user/1"
HTTP/1.1 200 OK
Content-Type: application/json
Date: 2012-03-26T23:23:48.470+02:00
Content-Count: 1
Content-Location: user
Content-MD5: uLcUX7L3SZknHpLvhUkERg==
Content-Length: 143
{
   "success":true,
   "cells":[
      {
         "birthday":"1992-01-15",
         "credit":"0.00",
         "lastupdate":"2012-03-27T14:23:48.466+02:00",
         "name":"bar",
         "age":33,
         "id":1
      }
   ]
}

This is the full HTTP with its header and body. As you can see, we asked in the HTTP request header Accept: application/json for a JSON representation of the user entity with id 1 in the database/schema demo1.

By default, Amforeas uses JSON as the transport format, but you can also use XML by simply changing the Accept header:

$ curl -i -X GET -H "Accept: application/xml" "http://localhost:8080/amforeas/demo1/user/1"
HTTP/1.1 200 OK
Content-Type: application/xml
Date: 2012-03-26T23:31:06.110+02:00
Content-Count: 1
Content-Location: user
Content-MD5: eOsCCV/1/zkXhxKIRMV4ug==
Content-Length: 261
<response>
  <success>true</success>
  <resource>user</resource>
  <rows>
    <row roi="0">
      <columns>
        <birthday>1992-01-15</birthday>
        <credit>45.00</credit>
        <lastupdate>2012-03-27T14:31:06.110+02:00</lastupdate>
        <name>foo user</name>
        <age>30</age>
        <id>1</id>
      </columns>
    </row>
  </rows>
</response>

If the resource doesn't exists, you'll get a 404

$ curl -i -X GET -H "Accept: application/json" "http://localhost:8080/amforeas/demo1/user/2"
HTTP/1.1 404 Not Found
Content-Type: application/json
Date: 2012-03-26T23:37:54.100+02:00
Content-MD5: 0+WJ/rKID3SXLnjerbee1g==
Content-Length: 39
Content-Length: 39
Content-Location: user
{"success":false,"message":"Not Found"}

Depending on RDBMS support, SQL errors will be mapped to HTTP errors.


Create (POST) a resource

To insert (POST) a new registry in the user table, we perform the following:

$curl -i -X POST -H "Accept: application/json" \
  -H "Content-Type: application/json" \
  -d '{"name":"my foo user", "age":30, "credit":45.0}' \
  "http://localhost:8080/amforeas/demo1/user"
HTTP/1.1 201 Created
Content-Type: application/json
Date: 2012-03-26T23:29:17.125+02:00
Content-Count: 1
Content-MD5: eLzHpBV+Q6y46F/teUejMA==
Content-Length: 30
{"success":true,"cells":[ {}]}

The HTTP response code changed to 201 (Created) which means the entity was created successfully.


Update (PUT) a resource

You can also update values by providing a PUT request with the ID and the columns/values.

$ curl -i -X PUT -H "Accept: application/json" \
  -H "Content-Type: application/json" \
  -d '{"name":"im updated!", "age":40}' \
  "http://localhost:8080/amforeas/demo1/user/3"
HTTP/1.1 200 OK
Content-Type: application/json
Date: 2012-03-26T23:36:14.299+02:00
Content-Count: 1
Content-Location: user
Content-MD5: dtt+NFNh9z5Ssh5ZYGt9yw==
Content-Length: 152
{
   "success":true,
   "cells":[
      {
         "birthday":"2012-03-27",
         "credit":"45.00",
         "lastupdate":"2012-03-27T14:36:14.299+02:00",
         "name":"im updated!",
         "age":40,
         "id":3
      }
   ]
}

Delete (DELETE) a resource

To delete you use a DELETE request with the ID in the table.

curl -i -X DELETE -H "Accept: application/json"  "http://localhost:8080/amforeas/demo1/user/2"
HTTP/1.1 200 OK
Content-Type: application/json
Date: 2012-03-26T23:37:20.803+02:00
Content-Count: 1
Content-Location: user
Content-MD5: eLzHpBV+Q6y46F/teUejMA==
Content-Length: 30
{"success":true,"cells":[ {}]}

Tables and meta

For Amforeas, everything after the amforeas/ path is an accessible resource, for example, the demo1 schema:

$ curl -i -X GET -H "Accept: application/json" "http://localhost:8080/amforeas/demo1"
HTTP/1.1 200 OK
Content-Type: application/json
Date: 2012-03-26T23:39:36.340+02:00
Content-Count: 8
Content-Location: demo1
Content-MD5: Fq5vDIHzxEYTBBeamLXbGQ==
Content-Length: 2337
{
   "success":true,
   "cells":[
      {
         "table_name":"USER",
         "type_cat":"null",
         "remarks":"null",
         "type_schem":"null",
         "hsqldb_type":"MEMORY",
         "commit_action":"null",
         "table_schem":"PUBLIC",
         "table_cat":"PUBLIC",
         "self_referencing_col_name":"null",
         "type_name":"null",
         "ref_generation":"null",
         "table_type":"TABLE",
         "read_only":"FALSE"
      }
   ]
}

If you ask for the database, its entities are returned. You can also query for a table's metadata with HEAD

$ curl -i -X HEAD -H "Accept: application/json" "http://localhost:8080/amforeas/demo1/user"
HTTP/1.1 200 OK
Content-Type: application/json
Date: 2012-03-26T23:42:15.254+02:00
Content-Location: user
User: ID=INTEGER(11);NAME=VARCHAR(25);AGE=INTEGER(11);BIRTHDAY=DATE(10);LASTUPDATE=TIMESTAMP(26);CREDIT=DECIMAL(8)
Content-MD5: dWYBu98TXrlGBjdvsDa8Gg==
Content-Length: 801

In this case, the HEAD response doesn't include any body, but your table metadata is included in a header with the name of it.


Querying

Apart of using GET requests, you can also use two more ways of querying

Calling functions or stored procedures

$ curl -i -X POST -H "Content-Type: application/json" -d '[{"value":2010, "name":"year", "outParameter":false, "type":"INTEGER", "index":1},{"name":"out_total", "outParameter":true, "type":"INTEGER", "index":2}]' "http://localhost:8080/amforeas/demo1/call/get_year_sales"
HTTP/1.1 200 OK
Content-Type: */*
Content-Count: 1
Content-Location: get_year_sales
Date: 2012-04-02T01:24:35.677+02:00
Content-MD5: mRewGokS4XVF1CEgjXrPxg==
Content-Length: 44
{"success":true,"cells":[ {"out_total":12}]}

As you can see, you call your stored procedure /amforeas/demo1/call/get_year_sales with a POST request, giving Amforeas the needed parameters in the request's body:

[
  {"value":2010, "name":"year", "outParameter":false, "type":"INTEGER", "index":1},
  {"name":"out_total", "outParameter":true, "type":"INTEGER", "index":2}
]

DynamicFinders inspired by Grails

$ curl -i -X GET -H "Accept: application/json" "http://localhost:8080/amforeas/demo1/user/dynamic/findAllByIdBetween?args=0&args=4"
HTTP/1.1 200 OK
Content-Type: application/json
Date: 2012-03-26T23:34:50.145+02:00
Content-Count: 4
Content-Location: user
Content-MD5: 3mTUmmN9ody68WB6/YXz7Q==
Content-Length: 507

Here we are telling Amforeas to find all demo1.user entities where id is between 0 and 4

{
   "success":true,
   "cells":[
      {
         "birthday":"1982-12-13",
         "credit":"32.50",
         "lastupdate":"2012-03-27T14:34:50.144+02:00",
         "name":"foo",
         "age":30,
         "id":0
      },{
         "birthday":"2012-03-27",
         "credit":"45.00",
         "lastupdate":"2012-03-27T14:34:50.145+02:00",
         "name":"my foo user",
         "age":30,
         "id":3
      }
   ]
}

Paging and sorting

Amforeas supports paging and sorting arguments when retrieving resources. Some responses from Amforeas include a pagination object which can be used for easy pagination:

$ curl "http://localhost:8080/amforeas/demo1/user/age/30?page=1&pageSize=50"
HTTP/1.1 200 OK
{
  "success":true,
  "status":"OK",
  "rows":[
  ],
  "resource":"users",
  "pagination":{
    "page":1,
    "size":50,
    "pages":4,
    "total":97
  }
}

To sort the data use the sort and dir parameters:

$ curl "http://localhost:8080/amforeas/demo1/user/age/30?page=1&pageSize=50&sort=age&dir=desc"
HTTP/1.1 200 OK

Date, Timestamp, Time

Amforeas uses JodaTime to handle all this conversions. Specifically, we use the ISODateTimeFormat. So if you want to communicate with Amforeas and read/write this data types, you must use the ISO format.

Date columns use the format yyyy-MM-dd as specified in the date() method.

Datetime columns use the format yyyy-MM-dd'T'HH:mm:ss.SSSZZ as specified in the dateTime() method.

Time columns use the format HH:mm:ss.SSSZZ as specified in the time() method.

For example, a user table with a birthday field of type DATE, and a lastupdate TIMESTAMP is returned as this:

{
  "birthday":"1982-12-13",
  "credit":"32.50",
  "lastupdate":"2011-12-12T22:19:14.931+01:00",
  "name":"foo",
  "age":30,
  "id":0
 }

Supported RDBMS

RDBMS Supported Tested
Mysql Yes Yes
Postgres Yes Yes
MSSQL Yes No
Oracle Yes Kind of
HSQLDB Yes Yes
H2 Yes Yes
Derby Yes Yes

Limitations

The following SQL types are not supported and will be ignored:

Fields of numeric types will be transformed to numeric when possible. All other types will be transformed to strings.

Technology

RESTful

Neither REST nor RESTful webservices are a defined standard but The Atom Publishing Protocol gives a pretty good layout to conform to. Amforeas tries to follow the conventions on this document.

Java

Amforeas works as a stand alone server or daemon and uses the following open source projects:

Changelog